The Transformation of Grinches: Behind the Scenes Review and Analysis

The Transformation of Grinches: Behind the Scenes Review and Analysis

It’s that time of year again!

The season of Christmas: the day on which many Christians attend services to celebrate the birth of our Lord and Savior. It’s the season where families are gathered together to drink hot chocolate while binge-watching old-time Christmas films.

It’s been two years since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Understandably, the Christmas spirit, for most of us, has been reduced to an illusion from the past. Will Christmas ever be the same? Who knows!

This uncertainty made me sit down and reflect on the central messages of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” One figure that stood out to me was the wicked Grinch. There are so many “grinches” in our society, and even in the Bible.

In this presentation, I will give a summary of each part of my series. I will also give you some key central ideas that we can apply in our personal and spiritual lives.

Mr. Grinch and Christmas

Overview: How It All Started

During the lockdowns in 2020, I was allowed to host a virtual movement in which we expressed our Christian faith and acts of protest against our nation’s evils. It’s called “God vs Satan.” You can find an overview of what we did HERE.

Over the holiday season last year, I collaborated with participants to put together a slideshow presentation. This included a collection of Christmas stories that I have written. Each tale was inspired by historical events that took place during that time, as well as famous narratives from the Bible.

Inspired by 1966’s How The Grinch Stole Christmas, “The Transformation of Grinches” is a fictional series that was crafted during the 2020 winter holiday season. The series consists of five lyrical and liturgical works of literature. Each scene is told from four different biblical perspectives (or profiles). These are Achan, Cain, Jonah, and Satan.

Profile 1: Satan (Grinch is Evil)

Mr. Grinch is evil; a pesky, filthy man, and the father of lies! He does nothing but cause chaos and steals the joy of Jesus Christ. This evil guy just wants to rip the Spirit’s gifts from the tree of life. Like Satan, Grinch is mean, nasty, and a vicious bear, who wants nothing for God’s children than for them to live in sin.

Grinch is the punisher of the seven reindeer in the East, and the ten elves of the West. Thus, I say to them, “Beware!”

Also, Mr. Grinch is a vile, violent, sleazy fool! He likes to spew murderous desires, and teach people the language of hate. It seems this bad guy does not know that my Savior was born in Bethlehem.

Get this, not only is Mr. Grinch an idiot for trying to tear down our safe havens. He also desires that God’s children are damned to the depths of Hades. So, who is this Grinch that sails from the East, and screams around this great Earth? His name is SATAN!

Now, it is Christmas! It’s the season of love and bliss; the gathering of the churches and the singing of Heaven’s choirs, Mr. Grinch’s reign of terror is slowly but surely coming to an end.

Commentary

“You’re a Devil, Mr. Grinch” is a song that was inspired by the famous song “You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch.”

In the song, Satan is described as “a man who rips the Spirit’s gifts from the tree of life.” In the film, the Grinch is famously known for stealing Christmas gifts from children and wrecking Christmas celebrations. He disguises himself as Santa Claus to deceive the children into thinking that they were receiving Christmas gifts that night. In reality, he had a malicious plan up his sleeve.

In the same way, Satan, in this piece, is known for manipulating what God intended for good by stealing the very blessings that God gave to His children. This is a very subtle tactic we often do not pay attention to when serving and giving.

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Nothing Good Comes Out of Satan

The entire song was based on a biblical passage. This is when Jesus gives an analogy relating the hypocrisy and the selfishness of the Pharisees to the nature of thieves and robbers. While Jesus depicted the Pharisees as thieves robbing the sheep from listening to the shepherd, this characteristic can also drawback to the identity of Satan.

Satan is known as a thief who comes only to “steal, kill, and destroy” (John 10:10). This is why I ranked him as the main Grinch in my narrative.

Nothing good will come out of Satan; there is no Godly attribute in him.

Profile 2: Cain (A Bloody Christmas)

It was the house of Cain where America witnessed such great pain. The Christmas lights were replaced with a sea of red blood. Sleighbells turned into funeral bells, playing songs of sorrow.

Righteous America is the descendant of Abel, robbed of its chance of life. Evil America is the descendant of Cain, leading its neighbors to their demise. No smoke is billowing from that ancient chimney. No flame kindles from afar.

There is nothing but gunfire and the sounds of sirens. The noise of a holiday riot. But, soon, the bloodshed ceased. It was a silent night. It was a grey and cloudy night of tears. But, soon, America cried “Father, help us! We are doomed, and consumed with the ashes of sin!”

Suddenly, God gave them mercy and grace and turned the red blood into white puddles of snow. Then, the world sang a beautiful hymn of praise. It was the birth of the Christmas cheer.

Joy to the world! The Lord has come! O, hail!

Commentary

“A Bloody Christmas” is a fictional parable based on the story of Cain and Abel in Genesis chapter 4. The scene is told from the perspective of two Americas: a rebellious, divided America and a righteous, peaceful America.

It is Christmas Eve, and a bloody riot erupts in the streets. The season of festivity turns into a somber occasion of mourning and grieving. Soon, the people within the land repent of their sin. Then God demonstrates His mercy by turning the crime scene into a scene of praise and worship!

The Joy of the Lord is My Strength

Joy is Restored Upon Repentance

The central idea is that God restores the joy of a repentant heart.

Like the story above, Genesis 4 gives us the story of two brothers who endured the pain of death and covetousness. Cain killed his brother Abel out of jealousy and envy. God approved of Abel’s offering and did not approve of Cain’s. He later repented, and God granted him protection and mercy.

The Grinch, reflecting on his sin against his neighborhood, felt such deep sorrow for those he had wronged on Christmas Eve. As soon as he changed his attitude about his wrongdoing, his joy and the joy of others were restored.

The human race is consumed with moral flaws, and their hearts are filled with the naughtiest of imaginations and fantasies. However, there is always a blessing in the process of repentance.

True repentance is not just an apology or a New Year’s resolution. It’s an inward transformation that is only possible through the working of the Holy Spirit in our lives.

Profile 3: Jonah (The Blizzard of Greece)

It was December 22, in a warm, cozy cottage. It was the week of the great Christmas mass at the Cathedral of Nineveh. The man would be instructed to preach against that great nation, for their wickedness was so great. Yet, he grabbed his things and rode his chariot to the great land of Greece.

The snow was as thick as the three towers that surrounded the city. The winds were so brutal and strong, that the man was thrown into the deepest part of the Mediterranean Sea.

How can a swarm of angry fish swallow this man whole, yet save his life? How can he survive frigid temperatures without a life vest? The waves were cold, so strong, and violent. His heart was frozen like ice. Surrounded by the thorn of disobedience, the sun would soon shine.

It was December 25, at the great land of Nineveh. The great day of redemption from the pit of sin! The organists came out and played the ten hymns of celebration. O holy night, the stars were brightly shining. It was the night of our Savior’s birth.

Victory for Nineveh, o night divine!

Jonah, the Reluctant Prophet
Photo Credit: Medium

Commentary

Inspired by the biblical narrative of Jonah, this story is a work of literature. It vividly depicts the redemptive power of the Messiah who came to deliver mankind from the curse of sin.

In the tale, a man is on a mission to lead the city of Nineveh to repentance. After encountering a violent snowstorm that nearly cost him his life, his determination to bring the Gospel message to a broken nation gave way to a time of great day of victory!

Salvation: God’s Greatest Gift

Material goods are nothing; they are meaningless compared to the gift of salvation.

Although Jonah could not be described as a “Grinch” in Scripture, the story does point out his sin. Moreover, it showed how God used his imperfections to share the Gospel message to a wretched nation impending the coming judgment.

The greatest Christmas gift you could ever give to a human being is not the money from your bank account, or the latest Catalac on sale. It is the wonderful gift of salvation that Jesus offered us by shedding his blood on the cross. It is not only the message that transforms the soul into the everlasting light. It’s also a committed and driven lifestyle that reflects that message. Let’s not just say that we oppose darkness; let’s back that up with how we live.

The kingdom of God is watching. The kingdom of Satan is watching. Two magnificent worlds: both the natural and the spiritual, are watching.

Profile 4: Achan (A Short Play)

(Scene)

James (thief #1): Give me the money, now!

7-year Old Child: No, thanks! Besides, I can’t talk to strangers! I don’t have any money.

James: Hey! If you can’t get me your stupid money, just give me these Toy Story DVDs!

Child: Why?

Achan: Mwa-ha-ha-ha! I just stole that $600 dress and that chimney from Santa Claus. Now, I’m hyped up! I hope I won’t get caught.

Satan (to Achan): Oh, would you look at the time! Some new company! Mwahahahahahahaha!

Achan: I SAID, SANTA, NOT SATAN, FOR GOODNESS’ sake! Now to dash before I get caught!

(5 seconds later…)

Samuel: Busted! I found you Achan! What have you done?

Achan: Uh, nothing!

Samuel: Don’t you play dumb with me, you naughty boy! I just caught you stealing that fancy dress after your Master told you not to! You tried to steal the joy of Christmas. You just committed such a grave sin against the Father of the Heavens, and His begotten Son!

Achan: Yeah!

Samuel: You can face your consequences, on the double! Naughty List for you, and the wrath of the Almighty!

Commentary

This profile is a theatrical and artistic representation of Joshua 7. It is a short story of a figure named Achan, who steals an object at the store, which aligns with the plot of Joshua chapter 7.

Immediately after the triumph at Jericho, the Israelites fight against the city of Ai but are unable to take it. God tells Joshua that Israel lost because of God’s anger. One of the Israelites has kept some of the “devoted things” from Jericho for himself instead of destroying them.

Therefore, Israel herself has become a “devoted thing,” which will be destroyed unless the sinner gets punished and the stolen objects destroyed. Following instructions from the Lord, Joshua assembles the Israelites. He does this tribe by tribe, then clan by clan, then household by household.

God reveals Achan, of the tribe of Judah, as the culprit behind the fiasco. He and his household, along with the devoted things he kept, are taken and destroyed.

Sins Demand Sacrifice

This story, along with the short play, is an illustration of the importance of obeying God’s commands. God commanded the Israelites to destroy all “the devoted things” – both people and possessions of Canaan. God commands such action in Deuteronomy 7:2 and 20:17. The ban seems to be in part a precautionary and a punitive measure. Why does it call for the destruction of the Canaanites? The answer is in the next verse (Deuteronomy 20:18).

The call to destroy devoted things also has overtones of sacrificial language. Like a burnt offering, the devoted things are to be destroyed by fire (Joshua 6:24; 7:15). And like a sacrifice, they are to be devoted to the LORD for destruction (Joshua 6:17). The ban also means, of course, that Israel cannot profit from war. It is a means of sacrifice.

The Christmas season is not only a reminder of the price that comes from our naughtiness. It also reminds us of the sacrifice that love and hope demand. Like the burnt offerings, hope requires that we “destroy” all things that will lead us to resentment. If not, they will ruin the atmosphere that Christmas speaks of.

Conclusion

“The Transformation of Grinches” is not only a challenge for many believers across America to examine their behavior. It is also intended to make them seek reconciliation for the wrongs they may have committed.

Just as a mother disciplines her children, the coronavirus pandemic has figuratively sent all of us to our rooms. While in confinement, may we think about what we have done and prioritize what is important in our lives.

Therefore, this series is a collection of motifs that we can all take with us as we enter a new year.

One Reply to “The Transformation of Grinches: Behind the Scenes Review and Analysis”

  1. Merry late Christmas, Alice!

    Thank you for publishing and editing this piece. I really enjoy using my writing talents to glorify God’s kingdom. I pray that during this new year, God will do a new thing for all of us, and we can grow in our walk with Jesus.

    Let’s continue this lifelong fight against the kingdom of Satan!
    🙂

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